Eating an Elephant

Everyone knows how to eat an elephant.

Turns out you can eat a whale, a cow, or a chicken the same way and you don’t even have to know which animal it is.

Consulting is an interesting business, at least mine has been.

Sometimes you get to walk up to a clean whiteboard, capture the project goals and help a company design a whole new product. Maybe that’s rare for others, but I enjoyed that type of work all of my employed career and even a couple of times since beginning consulting.

At times, consulting work presents a problem that is in the middle or end of the development cycle and as a consultant you don’t necessarily get the opportunity to influence, or even fully appreciate the big picture. Often, to be efficient, a consultant must identify only as much of the context of the problem as to allow for the solution that the client has requested. In these scenarios the successful consultant needs to be able to quickly understand the environment and design practices of the client, identify the discrepancies, and propose or implement an improvement. More often than not, the challenge of the task is not the solution, but correctly identifying the accurate and optimum scope of the problem.

Lately, I have been providing assistance in ASIC emulation, also called rapid prototyping. In these cases, the actual product is generally near the end of its development cycle. It is generally a large, complex system with multiple processor cores, interfaces, memory systems, etc. There is generally firmware and hardware involved and an elaborate hardware/firmware/software design flow and integration. The focus on this type of assignment is rapidity. It would be impossible to be cost effective and try to understand the entire scope of the project.  So the consultant must quickly learn the environment, the design flow and only enough of the product details sufficient to assist in the process improvement as assigned.

His best tool is experience, which allows him the ability to quickly recognize and adapt to variations in process. For example, most ASIC design teams use version control. Amd. most currently use SVN, yet they all use SVN differently to achieve similar goals. An experienced consultant knows the goals, recognizes SVN, or its variant, or other RC methods and quickly understands and adapts to the methods and variations used by the client. The same is true for design flow scripting, their suite of EDA tools and even the organization of the clients design resources and systems network.

Consultants don’t always get to eat the whole animal and may not even know what kind of animal it is. He just does his part in taking bites and a good one takes bigger bites.

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